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UI/ UX Design Course

UI/ UX Design Course

Pixelman

Regular price $800.00 Sale

Duration: 30 Hours in Class

The whole course is 30 hours, but each student is only allowed to enrol in the first stage for only 10 hours. Students cannot apply for a Certificate until 30 hours have elapsed.

Pixelman Education is offering the most powerful and popular Certificate program in User Interface/ User Experience course in Canada. This is the first time we added Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in our course outline.

User Interface Design Course or user interface engineering is the design of computers, appliances, machines, mobile communication devices, software applications, and websites with the focus on the user’s experience and interaction. The goal of user interface design is to make the user’s interaction as simple and efficient as possible, in terms of accomplishing user goals ” what is often called user-centred design. Good user interface design facilitates finishing the task at hand without drawing unnecessary attention to itself. Graphic design may be utilized to support its usability. The design process must balance technical functionality and visual elements (e.g., mental model ) to create a system that is not only operational but also usable and adaptable to changing user needs.

Course Outline:

Introduction to UI/ UX

In this course, you will gain an understanding of the critical importance of user interface design. You will also learn industry-standard methods for how to approach the design of a user interface and key theories and frameworks that underlie the design of most interfaces you use today. Through a series of case studies on commercial systems - many of which you likely use on a regular basis - we will illustrate the benefits of good design. We will also demonstrate how the costs of bad design can often be severe (in user experience, money, and even human lives). You will then gain a high-level understanding of the user-interface design process. You will be introduced to common design scenarios - e.g. improving on existing designs and starting a new design from scratch - and the general design processes that tend to be used for each scenario. Finally, we will begin introducing the large body of existing knowledge on design by providing overviews of core user interface design theories and concepts. This key foundational information will help you avoid “reinventing the wheel” when you are designing your interfaces in this specialization.

User Research and Design

In this course, you will learn and practice techniques of user research and early UI design exploration. First, you will learn and practise several techniques for user research, including in-person research and survey and log-analysis techniques. Then, you will learn to analyze and deliver user research in forms that support UI design, including personas, use cases, tasks, and scenarios. Finally, you will learn and practice ideation techniques that start with user research and broadly generate potential design ideas.

Prototype & Design

In this course, you will learn how to design and prototype user interfaces to address the users and tasks identified in user research. Through a series of lectures and exercises, you will learn and practice paper- and other low-fidelity prototyping techniques; you will learn and apply principles from graphic design, including design patterns; you will learn to write a design rationale; and you will learn how to design for specific populations and situations, including principles and practices of accessible design.

Evaluating User Interfaces

In this course, you will learn and practise several techniques for user interface evaluation. First, we start with techniques that can be applied alone or in a design team, including action analysis, walkthroughs, and heuristic evaluation. Then we move on to user testing, including learning from a series of usability tests carried out in a real usability lab, and techniques to carry out your own tests even without a lab. Finally, we wrap up the discussion of evaluation--and of UI Design in the specialization as a whole- by looking at the question of how to set and measure usability goals, and in turn, when a design is usable enough to release it.